Mise en place

one meal is made of three dishes: starter, main, desert. left the ingredients, on top the name of the dishes, on the right the process and a time; counting down: serving time is zero. organization galore

one meal is made of three dishes: starter, main, desert. left the ingredients, on top the name of the dishes, on the right the process and a timeline; counting down: serving time is zero. organization galore

“There are many recipe books, but very few based on meals. People often pick up a cookbook at home, but have no idea how to combine the recipe into a sensible meal. This book aims to help by providing meals that have been thought out in their entirety. They have been organized into thirty-one balanced menus each one containing three courses. You can also make your own menus by combining the recipes using the list.” —The Family Meal, Ferran Adrià

mise en place—prepare in advance, prepare in bulk, have components ready when needed

mise en place—prepare in advance, prepare in bulk, have components ready when needed

In el Bulli’s system the smallest unit is a dish—self-standing, tasty, ready to be combined with other dishes. This allows to create your own meals, and you cannot really go wrong. In addition the book offers 31 well designed meals, ready to be cooked. How can this system translate to publishing? For example what would be the smallest working unit? What kind of content would work well?

the tools

the tools

create your own menu. pick and choose, mix and mash. in a modular cuisine all things somehow come together as long as you keep the equation: starter + main + desert = meal

create your own menu. pick and choose, mix and match. in a modular cuisine all things somehow come together as long as you keep the equation: starter + main + desert = meal

Strange Rain

$ 1.79 for a somewhat interactive thought experience or meditation excercise

$1.79 for a somewhat interactive thinking experience and meditation excercise

Strange Rain turns your iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch into a skylight on a rainy day. Raindrops fall and splatter on your screen, shifting perspective in 3D as you tilt your device like a handheld camera. Touch the screen and guide the path of the raindrops, stepping through the notes of an eerie melody as you go. It’s a relaxing, intriguing experience that feels as if you’re holding a living window in your hands.

The more you touch, however, the more strange the rain becomes: layered skies, visual anomalies and shifts in speed and color, even the occasional cataclysm if you’re not careful. Before your eyes and beneath your fingers, the familiar becomes strange, and the strange, familiar.”

WHAT MAKES RAIN STRANGE? WHEN IT’S FALLING ON YOUR SCREEN—FROM THE INSIDE.

Also a bit of a promotional tool. If you choose the story mode, you have to read what Erik Loyer wrote. You can also choose the Feed mode and that’ll retrieve twitter messages of a certain theme. It didn’t work with mine.

Marc Saporta’s Composition No 1

composition no 1: the box of unbound pages

composition no 1: the box of unbound pages

The Guardian released an article on Marc Saporta’s Composition No. 1, which was first conceived in 1961, and re-born digitally (~2011) as an iPad app by Visual Editions.

composition no1: the ipad app

composition no1: the ipad app

“[…] the overall effect is one of poetic parataxis, disjunctive but coherent.

I’d feared the stochastic arrangement might lessen the overall thrust of the piece—why read to the last page when any page could be the last?—but I hurried to reach the ending. Another reader may have ended on a note of circularity. (“The couch, along the wall, is covered with a Mexican serape. Dagmar is sitting there with her legs folded under her. Above her head, contrasting violently with her blond hair, the dark abstract painting with clots of color that seem to be on fire is still unfinished. It is called Composition No. 1.”) My Composition ended with a bloody ambush of a hideout by the Germans, while two French fighters, sitting quietly out in the woods, listened to the screams. The last line—“A tall German woman with queenly bearing nonchalantly crosses the barnyard. She would be beautiful without her uniform.”—might have had little significance elsewhere, but here I was stunned by its eerily flat tone and sculptural asymmetry. It was not so much what the author did that was impressive, but what he, deliberately, did not.” —Robert Moor

instructions again

instructions again


Reminds me of the Book of Answers, now also available as iPad app, and Brian Eno & Peter Schmidt’s Opaque Strategies.

Bibliotype // bed, knee, breakfast

http://craigmod.com/bibliotype/demo/

adjust the screen and typography according to your reading gusto

adjust the screen and typography according to your reading gusto

Craig Mod is an independent writer, designer and publisher, who produced a number of templates for formless content to be adjusted according to your reading needs, especially suited for iPad.

He also published an interesting view on the future of the book and the challenges and chances for tablet design and reading experience.

Craig on Craig: “I believe there is an emerging confluence of simple technologies around books, publishing, networks and education that can be leveraged to change the way we think about learning and information accessibility. If you’re working in this space, I’d love to chat.”


Consider reading needs on different devices
Consider reading needs in different situations
Consider choice (a design that holds option for the end user not the producer)